Solved: The HAMMOND braille Mystery

See Part one I found a Hammond braille shuttle. Well not physically. I found it in the archival catalog of a school for the blind. However the school is unable to locate it physically, so, the best I have is a photograph. The previous theory for how a Hammond could type in braille was this: […]

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Ham-and-cheese

I was eating a ham-and-cheese sandwich today gazing at some Hammond’s when I noticed something interesting about two of them. The first is from around 1887-1890 with a serial number in the 12,000 range, and the second is from the 18,000 serial era. There are quite a few differences, can you spot them all? If […]

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a bit of character

Hammond shuttles are small works of art. Intricately cut and cast in pressurized molten rubber to harden, or vulcanize, into a precise chape with precise lettering, all neatly arranged on its face. An awesome achievement for 1890s technology. I was contacted by someone who thought they might have a unique shuttle, a 91st character perhaps. […]

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Braille Bumps mystery

I recently acquired a Braille Hammond in which I hoped to solve a mystery. Hammond produced a braille shuttle, ostensibly to print raised dots, but were those dots raised on the front of the paper, or the back when typed in the machine? My theory is that it prints those dots on the back of […]

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fe? au!

The beginning of the Hammond focused on two primary elements: iron and wood. The Pterotype, a precursor to the Hammond, was said to be made of “spanish mahogany, with parts made from brass, steel, and iron.” These were the materials of the day and we see that in the early Hammond’s. Until around 1916, Hammond’s […]

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Varityper vs Hammond Shuttles

Did some quick measurements the other day. The Hammond vulcanized rubber shuttles are .2 grams lighter than the metal Varityper shuttles. There’s also a slight height difference, with some modest trimming on the metal spine. Collectively these changes make it difficult to use a Varityper shuttle in a Hammond. But there is hope… In order […]

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blog post one

The Hammond Typewriter Company would have done well to have a blog. I sometimes wonder what it was like to work in that factory, to be the head of marketing, the secretary, or just the kid that shines shoes out front. The best I can get are photos of the factory, sales offices, etc. Like […]

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